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AT&F Blog

Joe Roddey

Recent Posts

New Forming Capabilities at AT&F Wisconsin

AT&F Wisconsin is excited to announce a new addition to the facility’s equipment capabilities. Coming mid-June, AT&F Wisconsin will install a 1500-ton press brake into the production floor. At 30 feet, this press brake is one of the largest in Wisconsin and features CNC controls that allow for tighter tolerances and high degrees of repeatability. The new press brake will bolster AT&F Wisconsin’s capabilities and will embody the enterprise goal of pushing the limits of size, scope, and scale in all of our operations.

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Press Brake Formed Girder Systems at AT&F

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) estimates that over 9% of short span bridges in America are structurally deficient (requiring yearly inspection and maintenance) and that over 188 million trips take place across these bridges every day. Replacing these problematic bridges has become a national priority for meeting infrastructure goals. The challenge rests in providing a cost-effective structural solution while minimizing traffic diversions by reducing bridge construction times.

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Robotic Welding At AT&F

When AT&F was approached to produce 40ft long complex weldments for a crane manufacturer, the company looked to employ new technology on a larger scale than is typically attempted. AT&F is known for the scale, scope, and precision of our long-forming capabilities. More recently, we made investments to cover long length precision welding using robotics. Traditionally, long length full penetration welds are susceptible to heat distortion when performed manually, or by common semi-automatic methods.

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How Forming Works

Turning a plate of steel into a finished part takes specialized equipment and a deep understanding of what the plate undergoes during the process. From heavy cylinders to frame rails to crane booms, large structures can be formed with a high degree of control, but different projects call for different pieces of equipment. AT&F has world class equipment and expertise in metal forming going back to the 1940’s so you know your project is in good hands, no matter the size or dimensions.

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AT&F Cooks for the House

After arriving at the Ronald McDonald House in Cleveland, OH, the team of AT&F volunteers quickly unpacked the groceries and began preparations. This was not their first time making dinner for the house, and their confidence in the kitchen was reassuring to many of the guests. The team prepared pizza and made good use of the four ovens in the kitchen. With up to 55 families to feed, dinner had to be big. Fortunately, a five-person team made quick work of the bulk-purchased food.

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AT&F Welders Support Wounded Warrior Recognition

Continuing on AT&F’s tradition of close involvement with the U.S. Military and showcasing our respect for the men and women of our armed forces, AT&F has partnered with the Wounded Warriors Project to donate 40 trophies, laser cut and welded from stainless steel.

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MIG Welding

While one of the most widely used and accessible methods of welding, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is actually a balancing act of many important variables that greatly affect the quality of the weld. Commonly known as MIG welding (short for “metal inert gas”), this method utilizes a consumable metal as an electrode like shielded metal arc welding in the form of a wire. The wire is fed semi-automatically or automatically through a gun that supplies the shielding gas necessary for protecting the weld pool from exposure to the atmosphere.

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Tantalum

Chemical heat exchangers, dealing with volatile chemicals at high temperatures, are prone to corrosion. Fortunately, tantalum is one of the most corrosion resistant metals on earth. AT&F Advanced Metals has experience with many specialty metals, including tantalum, and have manufactured many tantalum heat exchangers, lined pressure vessels, and other specialty application components that make use of the metal’s properties.

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TIG Welding: Precision and Preparation

When a welding job requires precision, the obvious method to use is TIG welding. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is a welding method using tungsten as an electrode and argon or helium gas as a shielding agent. When GTAW was first introduced in 1941, it used exclusively helium as the shielding gas. This gave it its original name: Heli arc welding. It is now referred to as tungsten inert gas welding, or TIG for short. It is a slow and difficult method to master, but a trained welder can use TIG welding to produce very high quality welds. But what makes TIG welding so precision oriented? And why do TIG welders have to feed the wire by hand?

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From the Floor: Weld Institute Expansion

AT&F is an industry leader in welding capabilities, with in-house robotic welding, and a Weld Institute that teaches students the fundamentals of welding—as well as advanced techniques—courtesy of our highly skilled welding engineers. Our Weld Institute, formed in (2015), is currently undergoing repositioning and expansion to accommodate larger classes and cover more welding types.

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